Pedego’s most popular electric bicycle models usually fall in the $3,000+ range, but the company’s newest e-bike is priced at just half of those figures. Rolling into bike shops today, the Pedego Element is a shot across the bow of the major value-oriented e-bike companies.

Pedego Element e-bike launched

The Pedego Element is listed at just $1,495, which is pricing territory currently dominated by rival Rad Power Bikes.

But Pedego is hoping that its network of over 120 retail locations in the US will give it a leg up in this new market.

That advantage could be important, especially since the specs don’t necessarily place the Pedego Element above and beyond other offerings in the field.

As a Class 2 e-bike, the Pedego Element includes both a hand throttle and pedal assist, with both offering a top speed of 20 mph (32 km/h).

pedego element

The 500W rear hub motor is powered by a 500 Wh lithium battery. The battery is removable and mounted on the downtube.

The Pedego Element features large 4-inch-wide fat tires on 20-inch rims, giving the bike a compact stance yet still allowing it to operate on less forgiving terrain such as sand and snow.

As Pedego CEO Don DiCostanzo explained in a statement provided to Electrek:

The purpose of the Element is to deliver the premium quality and local service that Pedego is known for, at a price that more people can afford.

The launch comes as a spot of good news following a large safety recall just announced by Pedego. Some of the companies’ most popular models including the Pedego Interceptor, City Commuter, Boomerang, Ridge Rider, Trail Tracker, and Stretch sold between January 2018 and August 2020 were recalled due to “a potential fall hazard.”

Electrek’s Take

It’s great to see Pedego launching a bike in the $1,500 range, since they’ve previously only dipped as low as $2k, and even then the company’s most popular bikes often cost considerably more.

And I’m actually a fan of the 20″x4″ fat tire format. It provides a fun, all-around e-bike without being a giant behemoth of a machine like some fat bikes I’ve tested.

I would have loved to seen some better specs on the bike, though, including a bit more power. With the option to go up to 750W in the US, it seems like a shame not to offer that power, especially on a fat tire bike that benefits from more power to ride in more exotic locations.

Lastly, I would have loved to see nicer integration of the battery, though this has never been Pedego’s strong suit (Hey Pedego, 2014 called. They want their rack batteries back!). Even Amazon sellers are doing sleek integrated batteries now on sub-$800 e-bikes.

But the saving grace here is likely the support and dealer presence that Pedego can offer. While direct-to-consumer e-bikes can sometimes leave you stuck with problems down the road, depending how serious the company is about helping customers, Pedego’s expansive dealer and servicing network mean that riders can get great shopping advice and after-sale support. There aren’t many e-bike companies that can offer anything close to Pedego in that regard.

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