Porsche has released the result of an impressive endurance test for the Taycan: they drove a pre-production unit of the electric car at high speed for 3,425 km (2,128 miles) in 24 hours.

The German automaker has previously been pushing the idea that unlike other performance electric vehicles, like Tesla’s, the Taycan is going to be able to maintain continuous higher power output for long periods of time.

Earlier this month, they released a test of a Porsche Taycan performing 30 consecutive 0-124 mph launches to show repeatable high power output.

Now the automaker is releasing the result of an even tougher endurance test.

At the Nardò high-speed track in Italy, they pushed a Taycan at a speed between 195 and 215 km/h (121 to 134 mph) for 24 hours. They would drain the battery, stop to fast-charge and change driver, then go again.

Stefan Weckbach, Vice President Product Line Taycan, was “delighted” by the results:

“the Taycan mastered this ambitious endurance run without any problems,” adding “the result achieved in Nardò highlights the advantages of the unique 800-volt technology and its high maturity level. Before the Taycan is launched on the market at the end of the year, we will have covered over six million test kilometres across the globe.”

He highlighted how the Taycan’s 800-volt power system and its advanced thermal management system made the test so successful.

It’s also important to note that the test was carried out “peak temperatures of 42 degrees Celsius and a track temperature of up to 54 degrees Celsius.”

For comparison, albeit not a perfect comparison since this test was done on public roads and without the full charging capacity of the car, the record distance achieved in a Tesla vehicle (Model 3 Long Range) in 24 hours is 2,781 km (1,728 miles).

Porsche is planning to unveil the production version of the Taycan, its first all-electric car, and all the specs and pricing information for the car on September 4.

Electrek’s Take

We are talking about covering 142 km (88 miles) of distance per hour including charging on average within a 24-hour period.

I think this is an interesting endurance metric to use for electric vehicles.

However, we don’t have enough examples to compare it to at the moment. The Model 3 Long Range 24-hour test is the best we got and it’s far from a good comparison since it wasn’t in the same conditions: track versus public roads.

Anyway, I believe that the Taycan’s results would rank fairly high if more EVs would have been tested in the same conditions.

What do you think? Let us know in the comment section below.


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