This new three-passenger electric trike replaces a car for hauling kids around town

Bicycle maker Sixthreezero has just unveiled its newest e-bike, which takes the form of a rickshaw-style electric trike that comes with a mouthful of a name: the “EVRY journey Tricycle 750W with Passenger Seat.” The overloaded name underscores the heavy-hauling ability of the new e-trike, which is designed with a rear bench to carry two passengers in addition to the main rider.

The Sixthreezero three-passenger trike could be the most realistic car-replacement e-bike yet, at least for parents that count twice-daily carpool duty as a main use of their SUV or other unnecessarily large car.

In Europe, dropping kids off at school or taking them to after-school activities is often performed by electric bike. In the US though, it’s more common to bring 5,000-pound (2,200 kg) machines into the mix.

But not only do electric bikes and e-trikes cost significantly less than a typical car, but they are much easier to operate in a city. They save both time and money (the former by avoiding traffic jams and the latter by removing the cost of fuel, parking, insurance, and other car-related costs).

The Sixthreezero three-passenger electric trike is set to offer that same type of family e-bike transport to us Americans, and perhaps along the way it could help turn two car families into one car and one e-bike families.

sixthreezero electric trike rickshaw

The e-trike features a powerful 750W front hub motor in a 24″ fat tire. By maxing out the legal limit for motor power available in the US, the bike should be plenty capable of hauling around three passengers.

A front suspension fork and a suspension seat post combine to offer a more comfortable ride for the operator. There’s no suspension in the back, but hey, kids are young and they bounce back quickly.

What the kids DO get is a pretty awesome-looking rickshaw-style bench. It’s mounted above 20″ fat tires that should offer a bit of psuedo-suspension for the rear passengers, and they even get their own diamond plate flooring to rest their little feet on.

There’s no real cargo basket under the bench, which seems like a bit of an oversight to me. But you could easily add some bungee netting to turn that area into grocery storage or a place to hang onto soccer bags and balls. Just make sure to keep any long and pointy things out of the spokes.

The electric rickshaw features a 7-speed shifter to make it easier to pedal at low speeds or up hills, though the handlebar-mounted throttle should help get the trike moving just as easily. Three-wheel disc brakes should shed that speed quickly, though I would have expected hydraulic disc brakes for the bike’s $3,999 MSRP.

There’s no word yet on the bike’s other tech specs such as top speed, battery capacity, or range. We’ve reached out to the company but haven’t heard back yet.

Currently available on pre-order with a promotional price of $3,499, the three-passenger electric trike is set for April 2023 deliveries. That should be just in time for nice cycling weather in much of the country.

Electric tricycles are quickly becoming a growing niche within the US e-bike market. Rad Power Bikes had one of the biggest e-trike launches to date with its RadTrike unveiling earlier this month.

Other e-trikes from a growing number of suppliers are increasing the available options in the US.

Electrek’s Take

Yes! Now THIS I can get behind.

I love electric trikes, and this is exactly the kind of heavy-hitting utility that they should be designed and marketed for.

Don’t get me wrong, it’s cool to see nice trike options for seniors. That’s largely what the RadTrike is, an e-bike for older folks that benefit from the stability of three wheels and the lack of balancing requirement at stops.

But I think that the biggest benefit of e-trikes isn’t just getting older riders back on e-bikes for recreation. The true biggest benefit is utility. Whether hauling cargo or kiddos (which is simply more valuable cargo), e-trikes have HUGE potential to replace cars. You suburban mom and dads probably aren’t going to be doing 10-mile (16 km) kid drop-offs on 45 mph (70 km/h) roads on an electric rickshaw like this. But all of you city parents surely can use an e-trike to do kid-shuttling duty in urban areas. It’s nicer than using a car, more fun, cheaper, and greener. It’s the perfect solution!

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Author

Avatar for Micah Toll Micah Toll

Micah Toll is a personal electric vehicle enthusiast, battery nerd, and author of the Amazon #1 bestselling books DIY Lithium Batteries, DIY Solar Power, The Ultimate DIY Ebike Guide and The Electric Bike Manifesto.

The e-bikes that make up Micah’s current daily drivers are the $999 Lectric XP 2.0, the $1,095 Ride1Up Roadster V2, the $1,199 Rad Power Bikes RadMission, and the $3,299 Priority Current. But it’s a pretty evolving list these days.

You can send Micah tips at Micah@electrek.co, or find him on Twitter, Instagram, or TikTok.