I’m driving my 2023 VW ID.4 Pro S in the snow – Here’s how it’s going

We were lucky enough to be able to buy a 2023 VW ID.4 AWD Pro S a couple weeks ago. And then it started to snow here in Vermont. Here’s how this EV is doing in the slippery white stuff.

I live near White River Junction, and we got a couple of inches of snow last week. And it’s still very much hanging around, along with its buddies, ice and slush. That’s because it’s been below freezing most days, dropping to 15°F.

We have a long packed gravel driveway, so it’s a good road to test the ID.4’s traction. It’s been over a week since it first snowed and it’s still pretty messy.

I’ll report back when we get a big snowstorm this winter because ours wasn’t exactly like Buffalo’s massive dump; however, our snowy situation provides enough of a challenge for this 295 hp with 339 pound-feet of torque EV.

My dual motor Pro S with an 82 kWh Li-ion battery pack has 20-inch alloy wheels with all-season tires. It also has a four-wheel independent suspension that gives it improved traction. I discussed whether I should get winter tires with the excellent folks at Volkswagen of Lebanon in New Hampshire, just over the state border, who sold me the car, and they said that the all-seasons should be perfectly capable.

So far, they’re right. The ID.4 has been sure-footed in various challenging settings, including my hilly driveway, on winding back roads, and on Route 4, which initially had some black ice on it.

Contrast that with our RWD Tesla Model 3, which, after my husband pulled it out of the garage on our first day of snow, almost immediately lost traction – the wheels began to spin and the car went nowhere. He slowly reversed it right back where it started and drove the ID.4 to work.

The ID.4 AWD has a Traction mode feature, which engages both motors together at lower speeds. I just hit the touchscreen to turn it on when necessary, whereas I leave it in Eco mode when the roads are clear. Some people complain that the touchscreen is a hassle, but I find it quite easy to reach. I put the gear selector in “B,” which maxes out energy recuperation.

It has heated seats and a heated steering wheel, so I’m warm and comfortable while driving, and the heated windshield and efficient windscreen wipers certainly made all the difference.

I feel pretty confident that I’m going to be able to safely drive this Chattanooga, Tennessee-made car in rough winter conditions without stressing out. I look forward to truly putting it to the test when we get even deeper snow.


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Michelle Lewis

Michelle Lewis is a writer and editor on Electrek and an editor on DroneDJ, 9to5Mac, and 9to5Google. She lives in White River Junction, Vermont. She has previously worked for Fast Company, the Guardian, News Deeply, Time, and others. Message Michelle on Twitter or at michelle@9to5mac.com. Check out her personal blog.