Tesla is currently pushing for a record quarter of Model 3 production as it attempts to become a profitable company, but the long weekend seems to have resulted in a setback as the automaker had much lower production this week.

As we first revealed on the latest Electrek podcast episode on Friday, we’ve learned that Tesla has produced only about 4,600 vehicles, including about 3,100 Model 3 vehicles over the last week (from Friday to Friday).

It’s significantly down from the previous week during whish Tesla produced “6,400 vehicles, including about 4,300 Model 3 vehicles, according to the same reliable source.

The difference is likely explained by the long weekend for labor day.

According to our tally, Tesla has now produced about 57,600 vehicles during the third quarter, including about 37,800 Model 3 vehicles.

Following this week’s setback, Tesla is still on track achieve at least the lower-end of their Model 3 production guidance of 50,000 to 55,000 vehicles.

The automaker is still attempting to ramp Model 3 production and Model S/X production remain somewhat steady.

Yesterday, CEO Elon Musk said that Tesla is on track for “the most amazing quarter in their history” and that they are “building and delivering more than twice as many cars as they did last quarter.” Tesla said that it built 53,339 vehicles, including 28,578 Model 3’s last quarter.

Electrek’s Take

As usual, let me start by saying that no matter how you look at those numbers, Tesla is producing electric vehicles at an incredible rate and that should be celebrated.

But it is also important that Tesla reaches its production goals in order for the company to become profitable and sustainable.

Therefore, we release those numbers to help our readers track the progress toward that goal.

At this point, there’s very little doubt in my mind that Tesla will achieve its original production goal this quarter, but it sounds like Musk raised those yesterday by saying they will actually double production from last quarter.

I think doubling Model 3 production is still not impossible if they managed to get and maintain their target of 6,000 units per week, but I don’t see them doubling overall production. That would be over 106,000 vehicles.

Depending on the next 3 weeks, Tesla could achieve a total record quarterly production of 77,000 to 80,000 cars, based on how production is trending.

Obviously, I’d love to be proven wrong here, but I just don’t see that happening unless Tesla also significantly increases Model S and Model X production.

What do you think? Let us know in the comment section below.

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