Tesla started pushing a new software update to its fleet of vehicles this week. We reported on the features for Model S and Model X vehicles, but we now learn that the update is even more significant for Model 3.

Model 3 vehicles on the new software update now have access to Autopilot’s Summon feature, cabin overheat protection and WiFi.

Summon is already a well-known feature for Model S and Model X owners, but it had yet to find its way into Model 3 vehicles even though they are equipped with very similar Autopilot sensor suites that power the feature.

The feature enables drivers to move their Tesla vehicles in and out of a parking space from outside the vehicle using the mobile app or the key.

A Model 3 owner recently showed a use for the feature using his wife’s Model X:

Now with the software update ‘2018.24’, this Model 3 owner will be able to also benefit from the feature – along with all other Model 3 owner with the Enhanced Autopilot package.

As usual, Tesla vehicle software updates are gradually rolled out to the customer fleet and it can take some time before it is accessible to every owner.

The new update also comes with WiFi access, which should make it easier for vehicles to download future software updates.

Model 3 vehicles still had internet access, but it was only through the LTE service that Tesla provides with all its vehicles.

Tesla wrote in the release notes:

“With this release, Model 3 now connects to available Wi-Fi networks. Tap the LTE icon at the top of the touchscreen and select the network you want to join.”

Finally, Tesla also added Cabin Overheat Protection, another feature already available in Model S and Model X, to the Model 3 with this new update.

Tesla wrote in the release notes:

“When active, your vehicle prevents the interior temperature from exceeding 105F/40C for up to 12 hours after you exit your vehicle.”

The automaker released the feature especially for parents afraid to forget their kids in the car on hot summer days.

It’s important to note that this feature is turned on by default, but if you don’t think that you need it. It can be disabled in ‘Controls > Safety & Security’.

Tesla started delivering the Model 3 without having completed its software user interface, but several updates over the last few months have gradually been bringing the vehicle’s software closer to feature parity with what is standard in Model S and Model X vehicles.

With 3 more features, this update this week is one of the most significant ones toward that goal.

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