automatic emergency braking Stories July 2, 2016

Following a fatal Model S crash on Autopilot reported earlier this week, one of Tesla’s main supplier for the Autopilot program, Mobileye, commented on the accident and explained that its Automatic Emergency Braking (AEB) wasn’t meant to avoid the impact.

Tesla has since responded to Mobileye’s statement, which we added to our article on the comment, but it’s worth elaborating on the differences between the systems as we recently learned more about them through tests earlier this week, and the tragic accident which is only now coming to light. expand full story

automatic emergency braking Stories July 1, 2016

Mobileye, an Israel-based tech company developing some of the technology behind Tesla’s Autopilot, commented on the fatal Model S crash reported yesterday. A spokesperson said that the company’s current Automatic Emergency Braking (AEB) system is only meant for rear-end collision avoidance and since the crash was front (of the Model S) to side (of a truck), the system was not designed to avoid it. expand full story

automatic emergency braking Stories June 26, 2016

Update: Tesla sent us a statement regarding the tests discussed in this article. You can see it in full below.

The Tesla Autopilot program can be confusing at times since it englobes a lot of different features like Traffic Aware Cruise Control (TACC), Autosteer, Autopark, Auto Emergency Braking (AEB) and others. While you can look into Tesla’s public literature on the features, like release notes and manuals, it is fairly limited.

There’s nothing better than some actual testing of the features to explore the limits of the program. A couple of Model S owners got together and did just that – though we wouldn’t necessarily recommend using their methods since jumping in front of a moving car is rarely a good idea. expand full story

automatic emergency braking Stories March 17, 2016

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety announced today that they have officially brokered a historic deal that will see virtually all new cars in the US equipped with automatic emergency braking (AEB) by 2022.

The deal includes 20 automakers representing more than 99 percent of the U.S. auto market. expand full story

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