Elon Musk confirmed that other automakers are now “low-key” using Tesla’s Supercharger network for their own electric vehicles.

The CEO didn’t confirm which automakers or the extent of the “low-key” agreement.

In the past, Tesla has often indicated that they are open to the idea of sharing the Supercharger network with other automakers, but it would be dependent on coming to an agreement on sharing the cost.

The automaker has been rumored to be in discussions with other automakers to come to such a deal in the past, but we have never seen any actual results.

Now Tesla CEO Elon Musk confirmed that it is actually happening.

When asked on Twitter why no other automakers have taken Tesla up on the offer, Musk responded that they are but it’s “low-key”:

Musk didn’t confirm which automaker or what kind of agreement is behind them using Tesla’s Supercharger network for their electric vehicles.

In Europe, the integration of other vehicles would be fairly easy since Tesla started using the CCS connector for its Supercharger stations last year.

It’s so easy that there was even a bug that allowed any other electric cars to charge for free at new Superchargers in Europe earlier this year.

In North America, other automakers who would want to take advantage to Tesla’s Supercharger network would have to adopt Tesla’s proprietary charge connector or have an adapter.

Interestingly, the news that other automakers are “low-key” using the Supercharger network comes just a week after Aptera unveiled its super-efficient electric car with up to 1,000 miles of range and solar power.

In the video unveiling the vehicle, Aptera showed an image of a Tesla connector when talking about charging their electric car:

However, the company currently only has a prototype of its electric vehicle and it’s unclear if the connector is the result of a partnership with Tesla on Superchargers or the startup simply using Tesla parts.

Electrek’s Take

We always thought that it would make sense for other electric vehicles to use the Tesla Supercharger network as long as it grows quick enough to support more vehicles.

Tesla already has some capacity issues in some regions, especially during high travel days.

But that problem can be fixed if more people contribute to the network and Tesla can grow it faster.

I am curious to see which automakers have taken Tesla up on the offer – even if it’s just “low-key” for now.

What do you think? Let us know in the comment section below.

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