Meet the Stacyc (pronounced “stay-sick”), a motorized stability cycle for small children. One of my favorite aspects of technology is the ability to bring people together, and the Stacyc does exactly that. Although intimidating at first, this bike is an amazing remedy for children finding their cycling sea legs. Strangely enough, it’s also allowed me to move outside of my own comfort zone, as I’ve barely peeked into a thriving community just outside my everyday experience.

Taking it back for a second, I remember riding an electric bike for the first time and the joy it gave me as an adult. The Stacyc does all that and more for children. I must admit, it’s kind of hard to stay partial on this product because I saw it work so effectively in a very short time. Stacyc motorized balance is $649 for the small version and $699 for the larger version. Compared to most non-electric balance bikes ($80-$200), the Stacyc is a tall order. Like electric bikes, if you can stomach the sticker shock, you will be rewarded with an entry into the wonderful world of cycling. With proper cultivation, this could be a pivotal point in developing a child’s confidence, self-awareness, discipline, and much more. (Can you tell my wife teaches early child development?)

 

Stacyc 12eDrive tech specs

  • Top speed: 14.5 km/h (9 mph)
  • Range: 1 hour (varies greatly)
  • Battery: 18 V 2 Ah (36 Wh) 18v 4 ah available
  • Charge time: .86 hour (1.3 hours for larger battery)
  • Weight: 8.1 kg (18.5 lb)
  • Max load: 34 kg (75 lb)
  • Electric Control: Throttle only
  • Brakes: Mechanical Band Brake
  • Extras: 3 drive modes: Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced, Mini-Moto stand or Sticker pack available add-ons

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I got my 3-year-old daughter a balance bike this spring for her birthday, and she liked it. She liked to stand in the cockpit and steer left and right, but never really got the hang of movement. I think she equated it more to a shopping cart than a bicycle. She caught on a bit when we would go down the hill, but after a couple tips, she quickly became hesitant to push her limits. I let her put her bike on the back burner, as she swam and climbed all spring and summer. This fall, Zach at Pedego Salt Lake City mentioned the Stacyc 12-inch as a miracle cure for growing riders. I can’t help it, I’m human. I’m looking for “that one weird trick” to get my kid cycling. Stacyc was kind enough to send a unit, and I must say; it works.

Jumping from the nest

I wasn’t immediately thrilled at the idea of her on a 18v motorized bike, but I didn’t like the idea of her not riding until spring again. Even on the grass, the first time she used it, it was scary. It lurched forward and almost tossed her off, and she was quickly overwhelmed. I promised her that I would walk beside her, hold the bike and back her up. She was still scared, but she did it. After about 15 minutes, I let go and walked alongside, and we reached a new milestone. Fifteen minutes later she was making small strides with the throttle, but didn’t quite know where to put her legs. During the next outing, I was astounded; she grew tiny wings. She started to chase me in the grass for about 20 yards at a time without touching the ground. I hadn’t seen her do anything close to this with the non-motorized balance bike.

Embracing the power

It took a bit of time to convince my wife to allow our baby to use a motorized vehicle. Even in training mode, the top speed is 5 mph. That seems like a lot, but I believe it’s a realistic minimum in order for the kids to adequately utilize momentum to balance. I learned this with our first bike. She didn’t really enjoy gliding until she went downhill, and the Stacyc motor provides that constant downhill, under control. Surprisingly, the throttle took very little time to learn. On more than one occasion, I saw her pick up the bike by the throttle, then correct herself by letting go and lifting a different part of the bike. She fell, at least 20 times, but each time she picked it up and rode a bit further. She could really feel the progress each time she rode.

Kid shoes

Need I say more? The Stacyc is a fantastic training tool to get kids comfortable on two wheels, but they will outgrow it. With two distinct sizes, 12 inch and 16 inch, Stacyc has you covered for awhile. But soon enough you’ll be trading in for a bigger bike, or passing the bike down to younger siblings. I let a couple other kids in the extended family try it out, ages 4 and 6. The 4-year-old was in love, and was able to match in 15 minutes what took my daughter about two hours to accomplish. The 6-year-old seemed ready for jumps. With practice, I think my daughter will honestly be ready for small dirt tracks in a year or less.

Why it’s great for parents

Yes, it gets the kids out and active, and requires minimal supervision. But there’s more to it. The other day, I had the chance to enter a local motorcycle and dirt-bike accessory store while looking for a tiny gear. I was met by store clerks and customers who were just as passionate about kids riding small motors, and far more knowledgeable. I learned about ride times, clubs, meet-ups, and a vast, thriving community of like-minded parents. My daughter is small enough that it’s still a dream, but there is a youth career path toward scholarships, sponsorships, and achievement that’s all based on two wheels.

Stacyc is here to stay… sick

I think the Stacyc (or the Harley Davidson dressed edition) will see its way into stores and under Christmas trees very quickly. In a very fitting way, it brings the same thrill of learning about electric bikes for the first time. As a product to teach kids to balance and use a motorized bike, the Stacyc is phenomenal. If this is your goal, you’re in the right place. As a mode of recreation, kids will go hours on it. As a youth entry into the world of cycling or moto, it carries the promises and dreams of a great world for our growing kids. I love the fantasy, but do we really want that life for her? We’ve got time to decide.

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