Tesla is often seen as the world’s leading electric vehicle manufacturer and it is in many ways, but not based on total vehicles produced – though it could soon take the lead.

The company confirmed that it recently produced its 300,000th vehicle.

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After the end of last quarter, Tesla broke its quarterly delivery record with 29,870 vehicles during the fourth quarter.

It brought its total vehicles delivered to date to over 286,000 cars since its inception.

  1. 212,821 Model S vehicles
  2. 71,927 Model X vehicles
  3. 1,770 Model 3 vehicles

Here are Tesla quarterly global deliveries of all current vehicles in production since their launches:

That’s impressive growth, but it’s not quite 300,000 vehicles. The company only confirms deliveries after the end of each quarter and the current quarter doesn’t until next month, but Tesla confirmed reaching the 300,000th car milestone in another way.

Tesla is putting a new CEO compensation plan for Elon Musk up to a vote and they sent out a new proxy statement about the new plan to shareholders this week. In the statement, they confirmed that Musk completed all except one of the 10 milestones in his previous compensation plan, including the ‘aggregate vehicle production of 300,000 vehicles’.

The only uncompleted milestone is achieving a gross margin of 30% or more for four consecutive quarters.

Electrek’s Take

Despite the Model 3’s slower than anticipated production ramp-up, it is already contributing significantly to Tesla total production and deliveries. At this rate, Tesla’s fleet should quickly become the largest all-electric vehicle fleet in the world.

For example, Nissan delivered its 300,000th Leaf electric car last month, but the vehicle went into production in 2011 while Tesla didn’t start producing vehicles in volume until 2013. Nissan is also expected to increase Leaf production with the new generation, but it’s doubtful that it will ramp-up enough to match Tesla’s planned Model 3 production.

What do you think? Let us know in the comment section below.

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