Understandably, everyone is focusing on the incredible acceleration of Tesla’s new Model S P100D – 0 to 60 mph in 2.5 seconds – but what is even more interesting, to me at least, is that the Model S is now the first all-electric car with over 300 miles of range.

We are talking about an EPA-rated range, which is pretty close to real-world range under most conditions. While the EPA hasn’t released the official rating yet, Tesla is generally pretty good at estimating it and they are talking about 315 miles – up from the 294 miles of Tesla previously longest range model: the Model S 90D.

The 90D received a rated highway range of over 300 miles by the EPA, but the P100D will be a first for the generally advertised highway and city driving cycle.

The new 100 kWh allows Tesla to extend its lead in high energy capacity battery packs. As we mentioned in the past, Tesla is years ahead of the industry in the segment. The Model S’ first officially announced all-electric competitor in the luxury sedan segment is the Porsche Mission E which is expected to hit the market in 2019.

Porsche says that it is aiming for the Mission E to have “over 310 miles of range” (500 km) on a single charge. Being based in Germany, Porsche is likely basing the estimate on the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC), which is much more forgiving than the EPA rating.

For example, the new Model S P100D has an estimated NEDC range of 380 miles (613 km). So no matter how you look at it, Tesla has Porsche beaten on range over 3 years in advance. In term of acceleration, Porsche didn’t reveal much information, but the company confirmed aiming for 0 to 60 mph in 3.5 seconds versus Tesla’s 2.5 seconds.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk also confirmed that Tesla will soon have another option with even more range in just a few months when the automaker releases the 100 kWh battery pack in non-performance versions of the Model S and X.

We estimate that a Model S 100D would achieve a range of about 330 miles and ~300 miles for a Model X 100D, but the vehicles will be slower than their “performance” counterparts.

Tesla will be focusing its production on the P100D versions of the S and X for the coming months at a rate of about 200 vehicles per week.

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