EUNORAU, a value-oriented electric bike maker, is back again with a new model of e-bike. The new EUNORAU D6 might the brand’s lightest model yet, taking the form of something between a road bike and a gravel bike.

The 18 kg (39.7 lbs.) EUNORAU D6 electric bike is quite lightweight, at least by e-bike standards.

And with a promotional introductory price of $1,199, it’s one of the cheapest electric gravel or road e-bikes we’ve seen yet, barely edging out the Ride1Up Roadster V2 gravel edition.

But despite the low weight, the D6 still manages to come loaded with some very nice parts, like a 250 mid-drive motor feature a torque sensor. The real power of that motor may be higher, but the bike is sold internationally and thus these motors are normally listed at “250 watts” to meet strict European power limitation.

The 60Nm rating of the motor is a better gauge of true performance since torque figures are not regulated. At 60Nm, it has higher than average performance compared to most other electric road bikes.

The drive system uses both a torque sensor and a cadence sensor that measures wheel speed 104 times per rotation. Most cadence sensors in e-bikes measure pedal speed just 12 times per rotation. The higher-precision cadence sensor combined with the torque sensor should provide much more intuitive and responsive motor application compared to most low-cost electric bikes.

The removable battery is rated for 360Wh of capacity and sits down inside the downtube, making for a sleek yet removable pack.

EUNORAU claims a range of 50-75 km (31-47 miles), which is certainly reasonable in the lower power settings.

Since there’s no throttle on this model, it will be hard to pull too much power out of that moderately sized battery at once.

That responsive pedal assist will likely be plenty for most riders, as these types of e-bikes are more common among cyclists-turned-e-bikers. The electric assist can be useful for pushing out on longer exercise rides or just giving a little extra help on steep hills, with the rider still doing the brunt of the pedaling himself or herself.

The US version will reach 20 mph (32 km/h), while the European version of the bike will be limited to just 15.5 mph (25 km/h) to comply with local regulations.

Both models can of course be pedaled faster, but you’ll be on your own at higher speeds without any extra motor assist.

The EUNORAU D6 is rated for a max load of 150 kg (330 lb) and comes with hydraulic disc brakes, a choice of a Shimano 9 or 11 speed drivetrain, flat or drop bars, 700x28C road tires, a color LCD screen, and a smartphone app for ride data.

The bike is available in two frames sizes and four color options.

EUNORAU is taking pre-orders for the $1,199 e-bike on Indiegogo, and the campaign started this morning.

Here at Electrek, we only cover crowdfunding campaigns if the company has a history of delivering similar products or if we’re able to test the new product in advance.

In this case, EUNORAU has pedaled around the block several times, claiming to have delivered over 100,000 e-bikes so far. We’ve also tested a handful of other models from the company.

While pre-orders are already open, the EUNORAU D6 won’t start production for another two months, and deliveries are estimated to begin in September.

What do you think of the D6? Let’s hear your thoughts in the comments section below!

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About the Author

Micah Toll

Micah Toll is a personal electric vehicle enthusiast, battery nerd, and author of the Amazon #1 bestselling books DIY Lithium Batteries, DIY Solar Power, The Ultimate DIY Ebike Guide and The Electric Bike Manifesto.

The e-bikes that make up Micah’s current daily drivers are the $999 Lectric XP 2.0, the $1,095 Ride1Up Roadster V2, the $1,199 Rad Power Bikes RadMission, and the $3,299 Priority Current. But it’s a pretty evolving list these days.

You can send Micah tips at Micah@electrek.co, or find him on Twitter, Instagram, or TikTok.