With new electric bicycles entering the market seemingly continuously, it is becoming harder to standout. And while some manufacturers are competing on price to create the most affordable e-bikes, others are competing on design and features. And that’s where SURU comes in.

The Canadian company introduced an electric moped that combines the best of motorcycles and bicycles to create a unique personal electric vehicle.

SURU electric mopeds

SURU has only been in operation since 2016, but already has a history of building high-end mopeds that look more like scooters than bicycles. The company was founded by motorcycle industry veteran Michael Uhlarik and Kevin O’Neil, who applied their extensive design and riding experience to develop a new class of EVs.

The company’s One Fifty and S19 models incorporated top-shelf components such as DOT certified motorcycle-grade wheels, brakes, suspension and lights.

The frame is inspired by step-through scooters and provides a comfortable, cushy seat and upright riding position.

With the popularity of SURU’s first models booming, the company decided to expand their lineup with a new version of the in-demand bike, the SURU Scrambler.

SURU Scrambler

SURU’s newest bike, the SURU Scrambler, falls squarely in the modestly powered division of scooters and mopeds. And for good reason.

By carefully selecting a number of important limits, the company’s vehicles are legally classified as electric bicycles in many countries. That gives them a number of advantages: no need for a motorcycle license or registration, free parking, using bicycle lanes, etc. Of course the exact perks depend upon local regulations, but riders in many countries will be able to take advantage of lax restrictions.

To help the Scrambler remain street legal in as many countries as possible, its power is limited depending on the country of sale. Americans get the 750 W version, Canadians get a 500 W version and Europeans have to settle for a 250 W version, according to Electric Motorcycle News. Though keep in mind that when companies like these offer a 250 W version, they can sometimes be more like “250 W, wink wink“.

The top speed is also adjustable depending on the country, but tops out at 20 mph (32 km/h) in the US. Other specs include a 31 mi (50 km) range from a removable 48 V and 816 Wh lithium-ion battery, powder-coated aerospace aluminum monocoque frame, 3” knobby motorcycle tires and a svelte 78 lb (35.5 kg) total weight.

suru scrambler

While it’s certainly not the fastest moped around, the SURU Scrambler might be one of the highest quality electric bicycles on the market thanks to its slew of motorcycle components. And that provides new riders with an introduction to motorcycle-level vehicles without the intimidation factor.

According to Uhlarik:

“There are so many people who love the look and feel of cafe racer and dirt tracker style motorcycles. But getting into motorcycling can be scary. The e-bike offers the ideal platform for all kinds of people to dive into the fun of the custom motorcycle experience without fear or high cost. The Scrambler is just the first of many iterations of the SURU concept to come”

While the price of the SURU Scrambler isn’t released yet, the company’s previous model known as the S19 retails for $2,999 CAD ($2,230 USD).

suru

Electrek’s Take

Color me interested.

This certainly won’t be the cheapest electric bicycle out there. Not by a long shot.

But for someone who wants a comfortable, convenient ride made from high-end components, the price range seems fair to me.

I love seeing motorcycle-grade DOT-certified parts trickling down into the electric bicycle industry. Is it more than necessary? Perhaps. But those dual coilover shocks and suspension fork are going to make for a super smooth ride, while the moto brakes will give plenty of reliable stopping power. And reliability is the whole point of using such high-end components.

These SURU Scrambler mopeds were made for those who prioritize quality and reliability over cost, and who want the comfort of a motorcycle or scooter in a package that they don’t have to register or insure. And I can dig that.

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