With the launch of the Tesla Model 3 Performance version, the Model 3 Dual Motor is going under the radar even though the less expensive version of the electric car appears to be quite a popular option.

Now we see the car do its first 0 to 60 mph launches and it appears quite fast. 

Tesla started taking orders for the Model 3 Performance and Dual Motor versions two months ago.

The automaker started deliveries last week and out of the blue last night, it increased the price of the Dual Motor version by $1,000.

The change came after Tesla confirmed strong demand for the vehicle as a majority of new Model 3 buyers are going with dual motor options (Performance and non-Performance combined).

Acceleration is one of the biggest differences between the two versions. Even though they are equipped with the same powertrain, the motors of the Performance version have been tested to have the highest power ratings and Tesla advertises the acceleration from 0 to 60 mph a full second faster.

Now some of the first Model 3 Dual Motor owners are testing out that acceleration and finding it to be surprisingly fast:

Here the owner managed to get a run a little slower than the advertised 4.5 seconds (4.68 seconds) and a run a little faster at 4.33 seconds.

Side note: we don’t encourage people doing 0 to 60 mph launches in residential areas like that.

It shows that owners could be able to get a little more out of the car much like Model 3 Performance owners.

We reported earlier this week that the Tesla Model 3 Performance is also getting quicker than advertised 0-60 mph in its first real-world tests and now the first Vbox tests are also coming back a little faster than 3.5 seconds.

In the case of this Model 3 Dual Motor, it was achieved with the 18″ aero wheels, which are equipped with tires optimized for range and not performance. It wouldn’t be surprising to see people getting even better times with better tires.

Electrek’s Take

At this point, there’s no doubt that the Model 3 Dual Motor is plenty quick. It will be enough for most people in my opinion.

Those who end up going for the Performance version, it will have to be more about the other features like the lowered suspension, performance brakes, and 20” performance wheels.

That’s how I justify my order and the $15,000 difference (when accounting for the Performance Upgrades) – not with the higher rated powertrain, which is actually the biggest price difference ($10,000 out of the $15,000).

What do you think? Let us know in the comment section below.

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