Ever since the launch of the Model X in 2015, Tesla said that they expect the SUV to receive 5-star ratings in every single safety category – just like the Model S.

NHTSA has yet to confirm those claims, but they now released the first crash test videos and therefore, the official ratings shouldn’t be too far behind.

Update: NHTSA has since confirmed: Tesla Model X officially becomes highest safety rated SUV with 5-star rating in every safety category

The company has always been very confident about the Model X’s safety – going as far as saying that it will have the highest safety rating of any SUV ever. Tesla even claimed that they couldn’t even “flip” the Model X during internal crash testing.

Also, like the Model S and any other all-electric vehicle built from the ground up, it doesn’t have an engine block in the front, which enables the addition of a large crumple zone.

It’s especially important for frontal crash. Here’s the description of the frontal crash test:

The frontal crash test evaluates injury to the head, neck, chest, and legs of the driver and front seat passenger. Crash test dummies representing an average-sized adult male and a small-sized adult female are placed in the driver and front passenger seats, respectively, and are secured with seat belts. Vehicles are crashed into a fixed barrier at 35 mph (56.3km/h), which is equivalent to a head-on collision between two similar vehicles each moving at 35 mph. 1 star is the lowest rating; 5 stars is the highest. More stars equal safer cars.

And here’s the video of the 2017 Tesla Model X frontal crash test:

Beyond 5-star rating in each category, Tesla also expects the Model X to have a segment leading probability of a serious injury in a high-speed accident.

To get a 5-star rating, the vehicle needs to achieve a probability of injury of 10% or less, and Tesla expects the Model X to achieve around 6.5%:

They also released footage of the side crash test. Here’s the description of the test:

“Crash test dummies representing an average-sized adult male and a small-sized adult female are placed in the driver and rear passenger seats (driver’s side), respectively, and are secured with seat belts. The side crash rating represents an intersection-type collision by having a 3,015 pound (1367kg) barrier moving at 38.5 mph (62km/h) into a standing vehicle. The moving barrier is covered with material that is crushable to replicate the front of a vehicle. 1 star is the lowest rating; 5 stars is the highest. More stars equal safer cars.”

Here’s the footage of the side crash test:

Tesla also made interesting claims about the side pole intrusion test. They say that it is about half of the next best vehicles for both the S and X. You can see below a side by side aftermath of the Model X and next best SUV:

NHTSA also performed a side pole impact test:

“A small-sized adult female crash test dummy is placed in the driver’s seat and is secured with a seat belt. The test vehicle, angled at 75 degrees, is then pulled sideways at 20 mph (32km/h) into a 25-cm diameter pole at the driver’s seating location. This test mimics a side impact crash involving a narrow, fixed object like a utility pole or tree. 1 star is the lowest rating; 5 stars is the highest. More stars equal safer cars.”

Here’s the video:

NHTSA has yet to update its website with the Model X ratings to confirm Tesla’s expectations, but we will update as soon as they do.

In the meantime, the Model X’s safety is already being praised by owners. Like when an owner claimed it saved his life after a crash with a semi truck and a father said that he ‘wants his family back in a Tesla’ after surviving a severe crash in a Model X.

Update: NHTSA has since confirmed: Tesla Model X officially becomes highest safety rated SUV with 5-star rating in every safety category

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