GM has been struggling to ramp production and deliveries of the Chevy Bolt EV since its launch in December. While it’s still a long way from the rate it needs be in order to reach its first year goal of 30,000 units, deliveries increased slightly in April with 1,292 units in the US.

That’s despite inventories increasing in California and some deliveries in other ZEV states.

Officially, GM is currently delivering the Bolt EV in California, Oregon, Massachusetts, Maryland, Virginia, New York, New Jersey, and Washington in the US.

Canada also received a few units, but the first year allocations in the country and some European markets that are supposed to get the vehicle this years are only in the low hundreds of units.

Therefore, the US is GM’s biggest market for the Chevy Bolt EV this year and sales have only now surpassed the 1,000 unit mark:

GM recently said that those Chevy Bolt EV owners have driven over 4,570,300 electric miles since the launch.

The automaker also launched an offer for Chevy Bolt EV leases ‘nationwide’ for $329 even though the nationwide availability is not expected until later this year and even then, it will only be through “authorized dealership.” You can always check with your local dealers for inventory.

Despite low availability, the vehicle can be found at an attractive discount in some markets. Some customers have been getting away with paying $25,000 after incentives in certain markets.

It’s not bad for an all-electric compact with over 230 miles of range. As we noted in our review, it could be an option for people looking to get into EV ownership and don’t want to wait for the next generation of all-electric vehicles coming at the end of the year, like the Tesla Model 3 and 2018 Nissan Leaf.

The biggest drawback is that it doesn’t support DC fast-charging over 50 kW (technically 80 kW, but it depends on several factors).

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