Elon Musk is not done with his Tweetstorm today on his way to Cape Canaveral in Florida for SpaceX’s upcoming launch. After confirming that the Tesla Model 3 will not be available with all-wheel-drive dual motors at launch and releasing a video of the first Model 3 release candidate drive, he now talks about the upcoming vehicle’s battery pack.

He confirmed that with the energy density of current battery cells and modules, the Model 3’s shorter wheelbase only allows for battery packs up to 75 kWh.

Now he didn’t outright say that it will be the highest battery pack available for the Model 3, but that it is what is currently possible with the Model 3’s wheelbase. If we read between the lines, it’s likely going to be.

We recently reported that Tesla was testing a Model 3 test mule with a 70 kWh battery pack, but as we pointed out, it doesn’t mean that it will be an option.

Last month, Musk said that he expects the average battery pack sold by Tesla will be between 60 and 70 kWh per pack, but that includes all vehicles battery packs and Model S/X can fit packs with up to 100 kWh of capacity.

It’s clear that the Model 3’s volume will bring the average down:

A 75 kWh battery pack on a Model 3 could easily bring the range over 300 miles on a single charge.

As we recently reported, Tesla is discontinuing the base 60 kWh version of the Model S, which means the 75 kWh pack is now the new base model for Tesla’s flagship sedan. Of course, a 75 kWh battery pack on the Model S will enable less range than on the Model 3, since the latter is smaller and lighter.

Interestingly, Musk also said today that the Model 3 will have less range than the Model S – though he didn’t confirm which version:

To be clear, the 75 kWh battery pack, if it will even be 75 kWh, will not be for the base version starting at $35,000.

As previously reported, the base version is expected to have a capacity of 50 to 60 kWh and at least 215 miles.

Musk hinted today that it could possibly be significantly more. Here’s what he said when a Twitter follower compared the range with GM’s Chevy Bolt EV, which has a range of 238 miles:

The Bolt EV has a 60 kWh battery pack, but the Model 3 could still end up with longer range if Tesla manages some efficiency improvements. We will have to wait and see.

We should have more details about Tesla’s battery pack and range options for the Model 3 as the company makes the online design studio available to reservation holders closer to the start of production, which is expected in July.

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