As we previously reported, the Tesla Model S P100D gets a lot of attention for its title of the ‘Quickest Production Car in the World’ – a very headline grabbing title, but it also has the longest range of any electric vehicle available almost everywhere today.

Now that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) gave its official rating of 315 miles this week, like Tesla estimated, it dethroned the Toyota Mirai for the longest range of any zero-emission car.

The EPA confirmed the energy consumption of the Model S P100D to be equivalent to 98 MPGe (98 MPGe city – 105 MPGe highway). It’s a little better than Tesla’s previous top-of-the-line Model S, the P90D, which was rated at 95 MPGe.

The higher energy capacity and efficiency gain allowed Tesla to push the total range to 315 miles.

The new range is enough to beat the Toyota Mirai’s 312 miles of range. Toyota was previously considered to have the longest range for a zero-emission alternative fuel car.

Now it’s a title held by a battery-powered car again. Proponents of fuel cell hydrogen often talk about the potential for a longer range than battery-powered cars as a selling point for the technology, but it’s becoming less true with the way Tesla has been pushing the capacity in its cars lately.

When first introducing the Model S in 2012, the highest battery pack capacity offered by Tesla was 85 kWh. In 2015, it introduced the 90 kWh battery pack and this year they made the 100 kWh pack available.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk says that they will probably stop at 100 kWh for now:

It doesn’t mean that the range will not increase. The 315-mile range is achieved with the performance version of the Model S with the 100 kWh, but Musk said that Tesla also plans to soon introduce the battery pack with the non-performance motors, which will result in a longer range – probably closer to 330 miles.

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