While reminiscent of the recent claims of unintended sudden accelerations in Tesla’s vehicles, especially after a Model X owner crashed into his own garage, we are not talking about the same thing here. Instead, we are talking about a possible acceleration without anyone being in the car – making a pedal misapplication unlikely.

That’s what a new Chevy Bolt EV owner in California claims happened after having parked his car in his garage earlier this week.

As the owner admitted himself, it’s hard to believe, but he says that the car moved on its own while both keys were out of the car and no one was around it. He wrote on the MyChevyBolt forum:

I was out of town (the only driver of the Bolt) and I get a call saying there was a crash in the garage. BOTH keys were out of the vehicle, car self-locked and shut down in park from the previous night. Wife heard a crash, goes to the garage and sees that the car backed up and ran into a work bench pushing in a wall. Granted, hard to believe, but both keys out of the car, she was in the house (no other drivers here), I was 40 miles away, and somehow the car moved?

He added that the car was in ‘park’ when he left it in the garage and he found it in ‘park’ again after having crashed into his work bench – damaging both the bench and the new Bolt EV:

The insurance company was called, local GM dealership notified, and the owner messaged GM corporate.

GM is apparently taking the situation seriously since the owner of the Bolt EV told Chevrolet Forum that GM has now sent an engineer and a representative from Michigan to look at the car.

The owner will be asking for the full diagnostic and it wouldn’t be safe to make any assumption until then. Hopefully, people don’t start associating electric cars to sudden acceleration events after the recent allegations against Tesla and now apparently the Chevy Bolt EV.

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