Nissan is announcing today a new goal to sell 1 million ‘electrified vehicles’ a year by 2022 as part of its new M.O.V.E to 2022 midterm plan.

While it may appear to be an aggressive plan for an automaker that makes about 5 million vehicles per year, Nissan doesn’t mean “all-electric vehicles” by employing the term “electrified.”

The Japanese automaker defines ‘electrified vehicles’ as “pure electric models or those with e-POWER powertrains.”

The latter currently represents the majority of Nissan’s ‘electrified vehicle’ sales. As we previously reported, the automaker’s e-POWER powertrain is entirely gas-powered since it is equipped with a hybrid powertrain that works with a gas generator charging a battery pack which feeds the electric motor. There’s no plug to independently charge the battery pack so the vehicles are entirely powered by gas.

Philippe Klein, Nissan’s chief planning officer, announced the M.O.V.E plan:

Our product and technology strategy is dedicated to positioning Nissan to lead the automotive, technology and business evolution. Our efforts are focused on delivering Nissan Intelligent Mobility, encompassing the three core elements of electrification, autonomous drive, connectivity and new mobility services.

On the all-electric front, Nissan reiterated its previously announced initiatives to launch new models.

The company listed the main parts of the Nissan M.O.V.E. to 2022:

  • Develop eight new pure electric vehicles, building on the success of the new Nissan LEAF;
  • Launch an electric car offensive in China under different brands;
  • Introduce an electric “kei” mini-vehicle in Japan;
  • Offer a global crossover electric vehicle, inspired by the Nissan IMx Concept;
  • Electrify new INFINITI models from fiscal year 2021;
  • Equip 20 models in 20 markets with autonomous driving technology; and,
  • Reach 100% connectivity for all new Nissan, Infiniti and Datsun cars sold in key markets by the end of the plan.

Electrek’s Take

Nissan didn’t confirm the mix of all-electric and e-Power vehicles, but I’m seriously worried that the automaker is focusing too much on the e-Power vehicles.

While they are more efficient than regular gas-powered cars, they solely rely on gas and they are simply not a long-term solution.

It’s a shame that Nissan even refers to them as “electrified” vehicles really.

So far, it’s only really working in Japan, where EVs haven’t really taken off yet due to intense efforts from local automakers, especially Toyota and Honda, to push for other alternative powertrains, like hybrids and fuel cell hydrogen.

To be clear, when I say I’m “worried”, I mean I’m worried for Nissan.

I think that there will be plenty of great all-electric models on the market by 2022 that most people will not even consider an e-Power vehicle or any gas-powered vehicle for that matter.

Automakers will inevitably have to update those plans like Nissan’s new M.O.V.E plan.

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