Update: Tesla confirmed the new and less expensive 60 kWh battery pack option, but didn’t release the new 100 kWh pack or seats yet.

Tesla will make an announcement today and introduce a new version of the Model S with new options. The automaker unveiled a Model S refresh less than two months ago in mid-April. The vehicle had several new features to bridge the gap with the Model X, but a few features were missing. A few of these features could now be introduced to Tesla’s flagship sedan as well as some possible surprises on the battery pack side.

Back in April, Tesla introduced a new front fascia, headlights and HEPA air filtration system, all features found on Model X, but SUV’s new ventilated seats were not among the new Model S features, but this time, Tesla could introduce them in the sedan.

New battery pack options are also expected. We’ve been hearing about an upcoming 100 kWh options ever since a hacker found references to it in Tesla’s Model S software. If Tesla finally decides to bring it to the Model S, it would be the company’s biggest battery pack to date. In April, Tesla introduced the 75 kWh pack to the Model S, but kept the 70 kWh as option upgradeable by software to 75 kWh – meaning that all 70 kWh battery packs are actually 75 kWh but software restricted to 70 kWh capacity.

It allows Tesla to streamline its battery pack manufacturing while keep the base Model S at a lower price. Tesla could explore this option further and offer a 75 kWh battery pack with even more restricted capacity at an even lower price. While the new high-end options would bridge the gap with the Model X, this new battery pack offer would bridge the gap with the upcoming Model 3.

For example, Tesla could bring back the 60 kWh option, which was originally available, on a 75 kWh pack and bring down the entry price for the Model S to ~$66,000 with 208 miles of range (like the original Model S). Tesla could offer to the more than 373,000 Model 3 reservation holders the opportunity to order a Model S instead. While the price would still be nowhere near the $35,000 base price of the Model 3, it would be the least expensive Tesla yet (aside from the short-lived Model S 40 kWh) and could convince some people to skip the long wait for the Model 3.

This is all unconfirmed at the moment and we will update when Tesla makes the official announcement.

Update: Tesla confirmed the new and less expensive 60 kWh battery pack option, but didn’t release the new 100 kWh pack or seats yet.

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