Tesla has been updating the drivetrain options for the Model S since the beginning of the year. The company removed the rear-wheel-drive option for the 90 kWh Model S across all its markets last month and just two weeks ago, it removed the 85 kWh battery pack option in Canada.

At the time, we suggested that the decision to remove the 85 kWh battery pack from the Canadian design studio likely indicates that Tesla will discontinue the option entirely. This weekend we learned that Tesla is indeed discontinuing it.

Tesla representatives have been contacting potential buyers in several markets, including in the US, to let people know that Sunday was the last day to order the Model S with a 85 kWh battery pack and that Tesla will now only offer the 70 and 90 kWh options.

Last week we reported on the tear down of a 85 kWh Tesla battery pack, which showed it could actually only be a 81 kWh pack.

When the company made the change in Canada, a Tesla spokesperson sent us the following statement:

“The recently introduced 90kWh battery pack offers unprecedented range and value that has been well received by our customers. As a result, we will no longer be offering the 85kWh battery. Model S is designed to be completely customizable, ensuring that customers are able to build the car that meets their unique needs and Tesla is committed to continued innovation and the development of industry-leading technology.”

The move brings the number of trims for the Model S down to four again – 70, 70D, 90D and P90D – similar to the Model X configuration currently offered in the US – 70D, 90D and P90D.

The Model S range will now see a bigger difference between options with the 70D having an EPA-rated range of 240 miles, while the 90D option being rated at 286 miles on a single charge.

The option has already been removed from the online design studio of several markets, but at the time of writing this article, the 85 kWh version was still available on Tesla’s US design studio. The 85 kWh pack was the last battery pack option available since the launch of the Model S in 2012. Tesla had already discontinued the 40 and 60 kWh options.

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